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He would never forget Girardi in Ferdinand Raimund’s Der Bauer als Millionar (The Farmer As Millionaire), in a scene where Youth takes its leave of him. The character of Youth was played by a “full-breasted soubrette,” in Lang’s words, and Girardi, without benefit of makeup or special effects, made a magical metamorphosis into an old man in full view of the audience. The persistent refrain of many typically Viennese plays was death and destiny. From his earliest films, notably in 1921’s Der mude Tod, with Bernhard Goetzke impersonating a somber, weary Death, the director explored kindred terrain.
Perhaps the theater that gave him the most pleasure also exerted the greatest influence–the fantastical Kratky-Baschik Zaubertheater in the Prater. Hardly Vienna’s most eminent, it was Lang’s favorite as a boy. Ghosts, goblins, witches, gnomes, and fairies pranced across the stage of this little theater in the park, which specialized in pyrotechnics, optical illusions, smoke, and mirrors. Lang made sure that Lotte Eisner took note of the Zaubertheater, and that she mentioned it in her book about him.
Although the Lang family patronized Vienna’s theaters, they may have visited museums and attended classical concerts less religiously. Lang admitted, in one interview, an obliviousness to the Sezession, the artists’ movement that broke with tradition and swept Vienna in the late 1890s and early 1900s. Although he visited museums elsewhere in Europe during his Wanderjahre, he rarely mentioned Vienna’s galleries in his reminiscences, and as a youth appears to have spent little time exploring them.
He was not infatuated with still art. Although he amassed a modest private gallery in Berlin, he would leave collecting–and museum-going–behind in Hollywood. In his spare moments, according to friends and associates, it was more the director’s wont to head to the Los Angeles planetarium or to Sea World. “He was an intelligent and artistic man, but he didn’t collect art,” said Sam Jaffe, Lang’s longtime agent in Hollywood and a noted art patron of the screen colony. “I didn’t see [much] art in his house, unlike [the director Josef] von Sternberg, for example, who collected pictures and paintings. I never got the idea Lang went to concerts. I never got the feeling he went to a museum.”
Lang said on more than one occasion that he was also left uninspired by classical music, growing up in this city that had succored Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, and her native Schubert. The director made a point of telling friends that he was a musical ignoramus; Lang liked to boast that as a boy he was thrown out of Realschule music class because he couldn’t carry a melody and always hit the wrong notes.
One day, many years after Realschule, the director and his friend, actor Howard Vernon, were visiting London together. Lang rang for Vernon in his hotel room, but the actor did not answer right away because he was listening to a Mozart composition on the radio. Later, Vernon apologized to Lang, explaining that he was held spellbound by the music. The director reacted surprisingly, confessing, somewhat shamefacedly, that he envied Vernon’s love of Mozart’s music, which left him cold. “I like folk songs, but ten horses couldn’t bring me to a concert or an opera,” he liked to say.
Lang did love traditional folk music, the colorful, sometimes bawdy, often sentimental songs of Vienna’s streets and cabarets. This was an affection he transferred to the United States, where he fervently embraced American folk songs and cowboy tunes. He couldn’t recognize many pieces by Mozart, but with tremendous zest he could and would sing, at the drop of a hat, the Fiakerlieder, Heurigenlieder (wine songs), or American cowboy verses–wordperfect, even in advanced old age.
“Music is the same to me as it was to Goethe–a pleasant noise,” Lang said in one interview. “I am an eye man, not an ear man.” His films had to take this deficiency into account. Where the sound track, or musical accompaniment, was concerned, Lang was forced–more than was characteristic–to rely on the ideas of others. Perhaps as a consequence the director preferred sparseness, the absence of music. “Having a musical background for a love scene, for example, has always seemed like cheating to me,” Lang said in one interview. This element of his sensibility added an unusual quality to his work; of his weakness, he made a strength.
The “eye man” was certainly a wide-ranging reader from early boyhood. The family owned the collected works of Jules Verne, whose books became well-thumbed–natural nourishment for the future director of Metropolis and Die Frau im Mond. Lang admitted once that he preferred the Germans who emulated Verne: Willi Gail, Kurd Lasswitz (pseudonym: Velatus), and especially Hans Dominik, whose cliche-laden works employed the Langian strategy of impressing readers with scientific know-how within imaginary settings. As he grew, Lang graduated to occult books and a species of literature known as Schundliteratur, or “trash literature,” one branch of which dealt with the love life of the insane King Ludwig II of Bavaria; another of which related lurid tales of robbers and criminals.

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